Staff Spotlight

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Aithyni Rucker, the CPD’s Diversity Career Opportunity Coordinator, was published in this month’s NALP bulletin.  Her article is entitled The Diversity Professional: Getting Your CSO in the Game Through Creative Programming and Outreach.  She co-authored the article with Jenia Bacote, Assistant Director for Career Communications at Mercer University.

Congratulations, Aithyni, on this accomplishment!

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Charlotte School of Law Welcomes 10 Master of Laws (LL.M.) in American Legal Studies Students

The LLM in American Legal Studies program is offered to foreign trained attorneys and is a one-year, 24 credit hour program that provides students with the opportunity to pursue a flexible course of study tailored to their interests, or to complete the coursework required to be eligible to sit for the New York Bar Exam. Both options provide students with significant legal training and a strong understanding of U.S. law.

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For the Fall 2014 class, Charlotte Law welcomed 10 students representing India, Colombia, Peru, Lithuania, Jamaica, Romania, and Germany. Several full and partial tuition scholarship opportunities to qualified applicants will continue to be offered through the LL.M. Ambassador Scholarship program. In order to be eligible for consideration, a prospective student must simply submit his application for the LL.M program. To apply please visit LSAC at www.lsac.org. For these significant scholarship opportunities, highly qualified candidates are chosen who possess the following characteristics:

  • Qualifying first foreign degree in law;
  • High academic achievement;
  • Demonstrated capacity for leadership and teamwork;
  • Superior personal awareness;
  • Ability to contribute to the practice, development and study of law;
  • Commitment to service;
  • Contribution to a globally diverse student population;
  • Ability to master legal studies in English; and
  • Willingness to serve as an LL.M. alumni leader and ambassador for CSL.

We are still accepting applications for our Spring 2015 class beginning in January. There is no application fee for first-time applicants and no fee waiver code is needed when you apply online through the LSAC website.

More information about the one-year, 24-credit LL.M. program and the LL.M. Ambassador Scholarship can be found at www.charlottelaw.edu/llm. No additional application is required to be considered for any of Charlotte School of Law’s LL.M. scholarships, including the LL.M. Ambassador Scholarship.

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Photo Gallery: Celebrating Talk Like a Pirate Day at the Charlotte Law Library

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by | October 14, 2014 · 8:00 am

Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — October 13, 2014

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10 Tips for Better Legal Writing

Throughout your career as a lawyer, you’ll be judged professionally on two main things: your interpersonal skills and your writing. Although the requirements of writing assignments will vary depending on your organization, your supervisor and your clients, here are 10 pointers that will improve your work product.

Do You Have What It Takes to be a Rural Lawyer? [podcast]

Many young law grads are being urged to move out of large cities and into rural areas, where there aren’t as many attorneys competing for work. As we reported in the ABA Journal’s October cover story, there are many small communities in rural America that are woefully underserved, and access to justice is a real problem. It would seem a prime idea to hang your shingle in one of these small towns.

Five Clever Ways Companies Are Helping Employees Fight Burnout

For the overworked modern American employee, the policies and perks offered by some of the most generous companies sound like manna from the corporate gods. Onsite climbing walls. Free housekeeping. Chef-catered meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Yet however nice such benefits may be, they can also end up acting as subtle ways to get employees to work more.

10 Best Literary Ted Talks of the Year

Every year on Book Riot we’ve put together a round-up of our favorite literary TED talks. Since our last post, there have been ten that deserve mention, ranging from inspirational stories about sight and connection to really random dog poems from Billy Collins and erotic fantasies from Isabel Allende. Because it’s TED. Zany is bound to happen.

A Good, Dumb Way to Learn from Libraries

Too bad we can’t put to work the delicious usage data gathered by libraries.  Research libraries may not know as much as click-obsessed Amazon does about how people interact with their books. What they do know, however, reflects the behavior of a community of scholars, and it’s unpolluted by commercial imperatives.

The Forgotten Female Programmers Who Created Modern Tech

If your image of a computer programmer is a young man, there’s a good reason: It’s true. Recently, many big tech companies revealed how few of their female employees worked in programming and technical jobs. Google had some of the highest rates: 17 percent of its technical staff is female.  It wasn’t always this way. Decades ago, it was women who pioneered computer programming — but too often, that’s a part of history that even the smartest people don’t know.

Taking the New LexisAdvance Interface for a Usability Test Drive

After spending some time this year assessing the usability of Westlaw Next and Lexis Advance for users of assistive technology, I had high hopes when Lexis rolled out its new, streamlined interface. I was excited to see what improved usability features would better serve the growing population of legal researchers with disabilities.

19 Magical Bookshops Every Book Lover Must Visit

Snuggle up with a book.

Librarians React to Pew Study on Willingness to Disagree on Social Media

As libraries continue exploring ways to weave online social media into their core service, a Pew study suggests popular Internet gathering spots such as Facebook and Twitter are not effective places for generating meaningful or honest conversation about significant news events. Not only are people not more willing to discuss controversial issues online than they are in person, in fact the reverse is true.

Your Guide to the Gay Marriage Fight

Each state’s legal status on gay marriage, mapped.

ROR – Return on Relationships is how to Measure Social Media

How does your law firm measure return on investment on social media? Likes, comments, followers, traffic or analytics. Big mistake.  Good lawyers get their work from relationships and word of mouth. When measuring return on social media measure with reputation and relationships in mind.

What I Do When I Fail

When I try over and over again, once in awhile I succeed.  So what’s the secret? Well, there isn’t any. You just have to keep trying.  That said, here’s what I’ve found to work.

5 Ridiculous Law Firm Commercials

When looking for a lawyer to represent you, what do you look for?

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CSL Spotlight: Enhancing Learning Outcomes

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CSL is leading the higher education industry in enhancing learning outcomes and raising standards for experiential learning to prepare our students to be practice-ready.

Below is a front page article in North Carolina Lawyers Weekly about the recent change to ABA Standard 303(a) which now requires students to take 6 credits of experiential learning courses, and features interviews with Charlotte School of Law Deans Camille Davidson, Kama Pierce, and Carlos Pauling.

Law schools are sizing up recent changes to American Bar Association accreditation standards

Recent changes to the American Bar Association’s law school accreditation rules should mean minor adjustments for most of North Carolina’s law schools, if first impressions of several school leaders are correct. On Aug. 11 in Boston — after six years of comprehensive review — …

Read more: http://nclawyersweekly.com/2014/09/02/new-rules-for-schools-2/#ixzz3FYWViEot

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Faculty Spotlight: Professor Scott Broyles

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Our faculty serve as consultants to local media outlets when topics arise that align with their individual specializations.  

Here’s an example:

Constitutional law professor Scott Broyles was recently interviewed by WBTV about the state’s gay marriage ban.

http://www.wbtv.com/story/26715033/nc-gay-marriage-proponents-to-move-to-overturn-ban?autostart=true

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North Carolina Pattern Jury Instructions – No Longer Available Through NCBA

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The Charlotte School of Law library maintains copies of the North Carolina Pattern Jury Instructions (Civil, Criminal and Motor Vehicle Negligence) in print, in the Reference Carolinas section. These pattern jury instructions are useful as a starting point for anyone creating jury instructions for a specific case. The instructions have been drafted by the N.C. Conference of Superior Court Judges and have been coordinated by the University of North Carolina School of Government.

Until Monday, October 6th, the North Carolina Bar Association had provided electronic access to these instructions by means of a licensing agreement involving FastCase, the North Carolina Bar Association and the University of North Carolina School of Government.  The NCBA’s license is not being renewed.

The School of Government has licensed the exclusive electronic rights to CX Corp.  Subscription access to the electronic editions of the Pattern Jury Instructions are available directly through CX Corp at www.ncpji.  Members of the North Carolina Bar Association may be entitled to a discount for a one-time subscription and annual updates.  Questions regarding how to secure the discount should be addressed to Joyce Brafford (jbrafford@ncbar.org or 919-996-4377).

~Susan Catterall~

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