Category Archives: Of Interest to Law Students

A Study in Environmental Activism

Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness along the Appalachian Trail  by Jay Erskine Leutze.

Stand Up That Mountain: The Battle to Save One Small Community in the Wilderness along the Appalachian Trail by Jay Erskine Leutze.

For anyone who loves the North Carolina mountains, the Appalachian Trail, the Blue Ridge Parkway, the Great Smoky Mountains… this is an all too familiar story. Jay Erskine Leutze’s first book is his account of the battle against a large gravel mine set to take down Belview Mountain in Avery County, North Carolina. Not only was the largest surface mine in the South to be located adjacent to homes in the small community of Dog Patch but also within close view of the Appalachian Trail, a federally protected park.

Jay Erskine Leutze is a non-practicing lawyer who graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After law school, Leutze retreated to an “intentional” quiet life in Avery County intending to write, fish and hike. His quiet life ended in 1999 with a test blast that shook his home and a call from fourteen-year-old Ashley Cox that got him involved in a legal battle against Paul Brown and the Clark Stone Company. The case became known at the Putnam Mine case.

This book is the story of Leutze’s four year campaign that started with pulling together a legal defense team to a landmark decision upheld by the North Carolina Supreme Court. Along the way, his legal team partnered with advocacy groups such as the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Appalachian Trail Conference, and the National Parks Conservation Association to oppose the mine. In an ironic twist, they were also drawn into supporting the State of North Carolina as the state Division of Land Resources revoked Brown’s ninety-nine year mining permit, an unprecedented decision. The story clearly shows the twists and turns of multiple court battles as the case goes through the legal process.

Just as the case meanders through the court system, Leutze’s story fleshes out the importance of the area, describing in detail the scenic aspects of the mountains and the history of various parts and people like Sugar Top, a condominium complex built on the top of Sugar Mountain that resulted in North Carolina’s landmark Mountain Ridge Protection Act. Leutze’s humble tone and passion for the cause makes this an unusually attractive story. Here is a true guide to environmental advocacy.

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~Betty Thomas~

Note:  Stand Up That Mountain has been added the Charlotte Law Library’s collection and is available for check out.

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ALR Student’s Corner: Lowering the Bar

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Lowering the Bar is targeted at the legal professional, including students and practitioners. The author, Kevin Underhill, is a partner at Shook, Hardy and Bacon in San Francisco and graduated from Georgetown in 1993. His postings are humorous, yet true.  He prides himself on verifying information before he posts it to the blog, and embedding links to cited authority and other resources.

Although legal professionals enjoy the site, it is written in a very down-to-Earth way that appeals to law students and non-legal professionals, as well.  In a convenient column on the right side of the home page, Lowering the Bar offers 30 links to other outside sites. There are also links within the site to archives and useful resources such as commonly used pleadings. To ensure easy access, there is a column that lists over 50 areas of law alphabetically. This helps if you are looking for interesting items in a particular area such as animal law or environmental law.

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Lowering the Bar archives older posts and, at the end of each post, provides links to other relevant articles on the site and metadata tags. At the top of the homepage, there is also a list of recent posts.  To make following the blog easier, there is a “Follow Me” button on the home page, links to social networking sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and several others, and an RSS feed.

My first experience with Lowering the Bar was a Google search that listed the blog among other relevant hits related to a federal case, in which police in New Mexico manually searched the anus of a man believed to be hiding drugs behind his clenched buttocks, that I had decided to research as a result of a posting on Facebook.  I went to the blog and found a post discussing the “clenched buttocks” case and other current actions, as well as, links to the original news stories and subsequent others. Lowering the Bar has posted updates to its original post, including links to the federal court filings and news coverage of the victim’s police and medical records.

Mr. Underhill generally posts every day, sometimes several posts a day. They usually discuss recent news and are interesting and informative, while still being entertaining. The recent murder investigation of an undercover agent is one example of an interesting news item that has appeared in several blog posts. The police had ruled the agent’s death due to natural causes, even though his body was found inside a locked duffel bag that had been placed in a bathtub. The blog posts several pictures of the expert witness recreating the scene by getting into a bathtub and zipping himself into a duffel bag.

I love Lowering the Bar; it is easy to use and has a lot of helpful resources. The blog also is a great place to find a little bit of humor about the sometimes, very heavy subject of law.

~ Debra Chamberlain Marshall, L’15 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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Filed under Advanced Legal Research, electronic resources, Of Interest to Law Students, Student Postings

ALR Student’s Corner: Law and the Multiverse: Superheroes, Supervillains, and the Law

What Happens When Real Law is Applied to Superheroes and Supervillians?

Today, I am taking a look at a blog called Law and the Multiverse: Superheroes, Supervillains, and the Law. While fighting villains, Hulk breaks anything in his way, Superman throws Ironman through a building, and the Avengers destroy a train while trying to contain Hulk. Have you ever wondered who pays for all of that damage? Well, two lawyers who are clearly superhero enthusiasts started this blog in an attempt to answer that question.

You might be asking yourself, “Who would read a blog like this?” Well, the answer to that are legal practitioners or others interested in the law who are also comic book nerds who like superheroes and have wondered who is liable for the collateral damage once the superheroes have saved the world…again. The goal of the authors is to provide a forum where real legal principles can be applied to fun fact patterns for the purpose of explaining legal concepts. Judging by the large numbers of comments for each article, which are almost as important and informational as the articles themselves, there are many readers who enjoy learning about the law in this way.

If you are an avid reader of comic books, you may have noticed that the storylines sometimes include legal questions. In an effort to make the characters appear more realistic, the ingenious writers of comic books add sometimes subtle and sometimes blatant legal issues to the storylines for our amusement. For those who have an interest in the law behind these legal issues, this blog attempts to answer those legal questions using the fictional scenarios created in the superhero stories. If you are saying to yourself, “Who cares?” – this blog is likely not for you. But, for the rest of us comic book readers and superhero movie watchers, who recognize these legal issues and wonder how they would be resolved, here is a forum where those questions can be answered!

The authors of the blog are attorneys currently practicing in the fields of intellectual property and insurance. There is a disclaimer stating that the information contained in the blog is not legal advice or analysis, but merely legal discourse based on fictitious scenarios. Most often, when analyzing a legal issue on behalf of their Superhero clients, the authors consider laws from across the various jurisdictions, rather than rely on a single state’s laws.

The authors also analyze the charges against Supervillians for stealing intangibles, such as a Superhero’s powers. In one post, the authors consider criminal charges against Yashida were he successful in stealing Wolverine’s healing ability, particularly since, without it, Wolverine becomes mortal and faces the possibility of death. Ultimately, the authors determine that, in the very least, Yashida could be charged with some type of theft or assault depending on the jurisdiction, and could also be sentenced to life in prison. Assault is a possibility because Yashida would have to extract Wolverine’s claws and bone marrow in order to steal his powers and turn him mortal.

The authors post anywhere from two to twenty nine articles every month. Those articles are archived, and the archives are easily accessible on the right side of the home page. A reader can also navigate and browse the articles by legal category.

Readers can easily share articles and stay current with the most recent posts by clicking on the Facebook, Twitter, or Google+ icon. In each article, there are hyperlinks to internal resources, such as Continuing Legal Education (CLE) courses, and external resources, which become very useful when the reader is not completely aware of what character or story the blog is referencing.

~ Jennifer Morgan, L’14 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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Copyright Questions and Answers for Information Professionals: From the Columns of Against the Grain – A Book Review

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For many information professionals, copyright fascinates and confounds. Copyright is glossed over in many classes, and librarians struggle to find clear answers to questions that arise in their practice. In the early days of a career, it is easy to blame youth for your befuddlement, but as years pass it becomes more and more difficult to plead ignorance. I have turned to a number of resources, including books, seminars, and massive online open courses, but all have skimmed over practical issues. For many librarians, copyright is simply a hurdle, not a concept to be lingered over, and swift resolutions to imperative questions are invaluable. Copyright Questions and Answers for Information Professionals: From the Columns of Against the Grain by Laura N. Gasaway goes a long way in fulfilling that need.

Gasaway, a recognized expert on copyright, has been wrangling with copyright problems for fifteen years now, answering questions from readers in a regular column in Against the Grain, the periodical offshoot of the Charleston Conferences. In her column, she addresses her audience of librarians, publishers, teachers, and authors, clearing the fog and replacing it with clear practicalities, one query at a time.

In her new offering, these questions and answers have been curated, updated, organized, and reassembled, giving readers access, in a single work, to Gasaway’s experience and expertise that was before scattered throughout her columns. Gasaway covers all the usual suspects, including fair use rights, library reserves, licensing, interlibrary loan, preservation, software, and digitization. Question-and-answer pairings are organized into topical chapters, and the book finishes with an emerging issues chapter providing current content on timely subjects such as HathiTrust and the first sale doctrine.

Each chapter features a brief introduction that provides context, but the value of the text lies in her answers to each questioner’s specific needs. While this idiosyncrasy does make the book poorly suited for cover-to-cover reading, it is perfect for quick reference. Other popular copyright texts use the question-and-answer format to show applications of broad concepts, but since the questions posed in this book are wide-ranging and true to life, it effectively provides applicable answers to specific questions. Unfortunately, this also means that when looking for concrete answers, there is no guarantee that guidance for a given question is present between the covers.

In this case, a comprehensive and exhaustive index holds the key to unlocking the precious wisdom inside this book. This is a weakness of the book. While a primarily question-and-answer format leads you to believe that this work would be well-suited for novices, specialized vocabulary or specific portions of the Copyright Acts are often indexed instead of the words used by the questioner. Underutilized cross references again hinder those without a strong knowledge base, and while excellent term definitions and clear, concise summaries of concepts are repeatedly provided throughout the text, the index does not easily lead a reader to them. Not having comprehensive keyword references may seem to avoid redundancy, but instead it limits usability. Readers will not be approaching this text with exact replicas of existing questions, but instead will need to glean their own answers through a careful reading of answers to similar inquires. Because the language of exact inquires is not carefully indexed, an e-book version of this work would be preferable, allowing readers to perform keyword searches and thus work with whatever vocabulary they have on hand.

While the index and other minor inconsistencies keep Gasaway’s content from shining as brightly as it should, Gasaway deserves great praise for her work’s greatest strength: her ability to strike a balance between handing out specific advice and teaching readers strategies to navigate the treacherous waters around best practices and general guidelines. Guidelines and fair use do not lend themselves to cut-and-dry answers, making many copyright texts full of generalizations. However, Gasaway brilliantly teaches her lessons through examples, focusing not only on the use of best practices, but also on the importance of careful risk assessment. She reminds readers that copyright is rarely a firm line, unfortunate though it seems. Instead, application of copyright law is often nebulous. Gasaway’s well-balanced advice guides readers in making their own choices, weighing their options, and choosing to overcome their copyright hurdles the way that is most appropriate for them. In this role, Gasaway is truly a master of her craft.

~Ashley Moye~

This book review first appeared in 106 Law Libr. J. 108-109 (2014).

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Resources for Professional Responsibility Courses and the MPRE

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If you are taking or preparing to take a Professional Responsibility course and/or the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE), there are many helpful resources and materials at your fingertips.

The Charlotte School of Law Library has a number of professional responsibility treatises, legal periodicals, study aids, and more.  A part of the CSL Research Guide collection, Professional Responsibility outlines and describes the print treatises and e-books available to CSL students, faculty, and staff.  This collection includes major treatises, such as the Model Rules and the Restatement; study aids, including volumes from the Nutshell series; and several other popular resources.  This Guide also includes links to the CSL catalog, where users can click into full-text journals and electronic databases and search for items and articles of interest.*  The Carolinas tab includes jurisdiction-specific resources for present and future practitioners of North Carolina and South Carolina.

Another CSL Research Guide, Academic Success: Professional Responsibility, includes a listing of study materials, including Emanuel Outlines, CrunchTime, E&Es, Barbri Review, Q&As, and more.  It also provides a brief description of the different types of study aids so you can determine what may work best for you.  These items are available for check out in the CSL Law Library.

CSL students also have access to West’s Study Aids Subscription, which has 13 different e-books on the topic of legal ethics and professional responsibility.  A link to those Study Aids is available on your Westlaw homepage.  You may search by keyword or browse by subject.

Finally, on the National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE) MPRE website, studiers can view NCBE tips on preparing for the MPRE, a subject matter outline of the MPRE, sample test questions from the MPRE, and more.

*Off-campus access to these electronic journals and databases requires a username and password.  Your username is your Last Name, First Name (e.g., Reid, Shannon), and your password is your Library Bar Code Number, which is located on the sticker on the back of your ID badge.

~Shannon Reid~

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Filed under Books & Stuff, Careers, collection, electronic resources, Libguides, Of Interest to Law Students, Student Information, West Study Aids

ALR Student’s Corner: Real Lawyers Have Blogs

Check out Real Lawyers Have Blogs for the Scoop on Social Media and the Legal Community

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Real Lawyers Have Blogs is a legal technology blog authored by Kevin O’Keefe, LexBlog’s CEO and publisher. Through this blog, Mr. O’Keefe encourages law firms to engage in online community building and business development. His posts often stem from Twitter discussions with legal professionals, as Mr. O’Keefe is a frequent tweeter himself.

The content on the blog suggests that its target audience is law firms and lawyers. The posts on the blog widely discuss issues related to lawyers and law firms and their involvement in the online community. For example, the blog discussions range from what lawyers should put in their online profiles to what clients expect in those profiles to what lawyers think about other lawyers who use social media.  Real Lawyers Have Blogs also provides great resources like blog posts about the 10 most popular stories Tweeted during the week and a section on the “Top 10 in Law Blogs,” each providing hyperlinks to the named external blogs.  Real Lawyers Have Blogs lets its users access much of its information through internal and external hyperlinks.

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Real Lawyers Have Blogs also allows its users to stay connected through various social networking sites, including Google+, Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Additionally, followers may subscribe to all posts via RSS feed or email. The blog organizes its older posts by month and year. For instance, if a user goes to the “Archives” and selects October 2013 from the drop-down menu, she gets all of the posts from the month of October 2013, starting with the most recent one. The “Archives” goes back 10 years to October 2003.  There are only three posts from that oldest archive, versus the near daily posts of the October 2013 archive, demonstrating the substantial growth of the blog and its readership over the past decade.

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Below the day’s blog posting, there is a section that displays other blog posts authored by Kevin O’Keefe. This area displays the date posted, the name of the original host site for the blog post, a link for further reading of the post’s full text, and a link to the comments posted. To the right of this section, Mr. O’Keefe populates the page with additional articles that would interest lawyers plugged into the online community.  Some of those articles are collected in a section entitled “Best In Law Blogs” which provides a featured blog article, its date and author, and a hyperlink to the “Best In Law Blog Archives” for additional reading. Additional articles can be found in sections entitled “Events” and “New to the Network,” each with its own archives. The format of these sections is clear and easy to read. The information provided here is also a good source of reference for users who enjoy following Mr. O’Keefe’s blogs.

The contact information (address, fax, and phone) for Real Lawyers Have Blogs is at the base of the home page, along with hyperlinks to the blog’s privacy policy and disclaimer information. At the bottom of the blog, there is a great feature that allows readers to quickly access the best and most read blog articles via hyperlink from “Best of Real Lawyers Have Blogs,” “Latest Across LXBN,” and “Most Read.”

There are several ways that users can participate in the blog’s community, particularly those who have mastered the use of social media.  They can post questions or comments through LexBlog or simply fill out the required fields and send their questions or comments from the blog’s home page. A user may also click the “LinkedIn Discussion Group” button to participate in the blog’s community via LinkedIn, or “Like” the blog on Facebook.

Lawyers and law firms alike should keep abreast of the to-dos within the social media community by staying connected to Real Lawyers Have Blogs via Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Twitter, RSS feed, or email. Doing so will give lawyers an edge on social media use within the legal profession.

~ Shantel Tatem, L’14 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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April Happenings

Here’s what’s happening this month, peeps!

Easter egg hunts:

PALS Easter celebration April 13 at 3:00 pm at Freedom Park (at the Princeton Road entrance). You’ll find everyone in the Princeton shelter!

Romare Bearden Park, Independence Park, Queens UniversityLatta Plantation, Historic Rosedale Plantation, Flashlight Easter Egg Hunt, Peter Rabbit’s Garden Adventure. Charlotte on the cheap has even more!

Easter Brunch deals

Earth Day: Earth Day Play Date

Music Miley Cyrus, Miles and Coltrane, Lady Antebellum, Chevelle, Kenny Loggins, Kat Williams, Bruce Springsteen, Chick Corea, Weezer, Local Natives, Jimmy Buffett, Zucherro, Tuck Fest

Performing Arts: Othello, Other Desert Cities, Ghost the Musical, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot, Dances of India, Debby Boone—Swing This!, Little Red Riding Hood, All Russian, Charlotte Symphony Youth and Junior Youth Orchestras Youth Festival Concert, Charlie Chaplin’s City Lights, Post Secret: the show, Blue Man Group, Peter and the Starcatcher, Tao: Phoenix Rising, Ben Sollee, Spring Forward, Star Gazer: A Trek to Outer Space

Sports: BB&T Ballpark Grand Opening, Charity Golf Tournament, Wells Fargo Championship, Queen’s Cup Steeplechase

For laughs: DL Hughley, Nikki Glaser, Doug Benson, The Rich Guzzi Comedy Hypnosis Show

For the kids: The Reluctant Dragon, The Owl who was afraid of the dark,

For the “furry” kids: Pet Palooza, Bark in the Park

Chews&Booze: Amazing Race Bar Crawl, Taste of the New South Savor the Sixties, Taste of the the Nation, $15 all you can eat crawfish boil at e2, Free cone day at Ben&Jerry’s, Alive After 5

Races: Charlotte 5k Color Vibe, TuckFest Half Marathon, Freemorewest 5k on the Greenway

Other fun events: Girls’ Night Out, Passport for Fashion, Purses with a Purpose,Record Store Day, Jillian Michaels, Tiny House Conference, Dixie Charlotte Gun & Knife Show, Charlotte Auto Fair, Hands on Charlotte Day, Kings Drive Art Walk, Better Living  Home & Garden Expo

~Jamie Sunnycalb~

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ALR Student’s Corner: Screw You Guys, I’m Going Home

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For the past few weeks, I have been following the legal blog Screw You Guys, I’m Going Home.[1]  It focuses on labor and employment issues, particularly those stemming from horrendous, indecent managers, affecting employees of all different types of corporations, companies and non-profit organizations.  This blog proclaims its mission as “what you need to know before you scream ‘I quit,’ get fired, or decide to sue the bastards.”[2]  While the tone is humorous, the mission of the blog authors is truly serious – to advocate for employees stressed about their current job stability and worried about their financial futures.  In support of this mission, the blog helps these folks fight back with information about recourse to the courts and federal regulatory agencies like the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the National Labor Relations Board.

I would be remiss if I did not disclose the fact that I currently serve as Human Resources Director for one of the largest Steel Manufactures in North America and am responsible for all Human Resources activities for the largest manufacturing site in North America with 1,000 employees.  I will not proclaim that I have seen everything; however, I have had my fair share of interesting situations.  Often these situations fall somewhere in the grey area that is not expressly covered by the policies which govern our employment and labor relations.  Personally, I find this blog to be a resource for those of us who are responsible for labor relations just as it is a resource for the employees who may be suffering from a power obsessed leader.

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This blog posts discussed some very interesting topics over the past few weeks such as bullying, the termination of employees for use of personal electronic devices, surveillance of employees, and normal discriminatory issues like terminations that violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  For me, the blog posts on the topic of bullying are the most interesting because it is a very hot topic in our culture.  Specifically, this blog outlined the fact that there are currently no bullying statutes in effect to protect employees from a bully boss.  However, this blog breaks down a typical bullying situation into the individual acts of the bully and explains how each of his acts may violate a law or company policy.  For example, the blog post by Donna Ballman on November 8, 2013 titled 7 Claims Jonathan Martin May Have Regarding Dolphins Bullying Under Florida Law[3] suggests that a victim of a bully may bring a claim against him for breach of contract, race or age-based harassment, assault/battery, or intentional inflection of emotional distress.  This is a fantastic blog and a great way to inform employees that recourse exists under the law to address a bully manager, even without there being a specific statute on bullying. For the managerial side, this blog is a valuable tool to enlighten managers as to the specific instances in an organization that need to be regulated.

Another interesting blog post discussed the new practice of employers requiring employees to bring their personal electronic devices to work.[4]  This is a new practice which allows employees to use their personal computers, tablets and cell phones for their jobs.  While this is favored by employees because it allows them to work on their preferred electronic devices and by employers because it cuts costs to maintain the equipment, the policy presents many issues.  The most important of those issues is the corporation’s duty to secure confidential information on those personal electronic devices when the employee’s position terminates.  Often employers take an overly broad approach and wipe the entire device which deletes the personal data of the former employee.  My employees are facing this risk and feel that they can not leave the employer for fear of loosing there personal information and pictures.  Luckily, resources like this blog provide insight into the rights of employees and employers dealing with this situation.  Specifically, this blog advises employees to deny their employer’s request to wipe their devices and if the employer proceeds anyway, to seek restitution under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the Stored Communications Act.

Ultimately, the employment relationship is ever changing and information for employees and employers is essential to maintaining compliance.  Furthermore, the most difficult situation will not be expressly laid out in policy and if we can learn what to do and not to do from others, we will be better equipped to maintain a positive employment relationship with all members of the organization.  There will always be interesting situations in the professional environment and dealing with this appropriately can have huge cost savings for the employees and employers.

~ Kenneth Schappert, L’14 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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Need Student Publishing Support? Your Library has a Guide for That!

While some long to see their names in lights, and others their names in block lettering across the cover of a bound volume, publishing as a student is a route each and every one of you can benefit from, even those without specific dreams of grandeur.   Seeking out potential avenues of publications and creating content not only allows you to contribute to the profession and legal community, but also gives you a chance to build a public profile, develop your writing skills, and advance your learning in your chosen fields.

Do you know about our Research Guides page, which features a range of information tools designed to assist you with your research and study at Charlotte School of Law?

This page now plays host to our newest research guide, focused specifically on student publishing support.  Featuring both academic writing resources available through your library and free online materials, this guide serves as a one-stop resource to connect you with writing and publishing advice, submission guidelines for various journals and tools to help you decide where to submit.  It also provides information on copyright and your own rights as an author, resources for empirical research, and additional resources specifically tailored for law review.

And as always, if you run in to any questions or need further advice, don’t hesitate to ask your friendly library staff for assistance!

~Ashley Moye~

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ALR Student’s Corner: The Careerist Blog

The Careerist is a fun, informative blog designed for just about anyone in the legal field or anyone pursuing a legal career.

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Author Vivia Chen, a former corporate lawyer, applies a fresh approach to lawyering while offering news, tips, and advice.  The Careerist focuses on legal developments, career and life satisfaction, as well as, up-to-date office trends.  There is also an emphasis on how lawyers enjoy work/life balance.  With a blog post nearly every day, legal news is current with a humorous edge.  An appealing part of this blog is the author’s wide range of topics that she discusses regularly.  The Careerist blog topics include the following:

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There are several links to outside resources from The Careerist home page.  There are drop down menus for job seekers and employers.  Job seekers have the opportunity to job search and post their resumes.  The job search link leads to an outside site, lawjobs.com.  Employers can post a job and search for resumes through lawjobs.com.  

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Another link from the home page is “News and Views.” Hovering over this link leads to subtopics such as career news, tips for success, compensation matters, and profiles.  “Profiles” leads to an attorney spotlight page which culls attorney profiles from various media and legal resources.  The articles here highlight attorneys beyond their work in the office and showcase their community-service endeavors and interests outside of their law careers.  For example, one spotlight focused on a New York judge who left the bench to serve a tour overseas with the Army.  The “Compensation Matters” link leads to law-related articles pertaining to money matters, such as an article about how the Texas legislature approved pay raises for judges.

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Law students can find their share of pertinent legal news on The Careerist.  Several blog posts in the last few months have highlighted articles for law students and law schools.  For instance, one particular post from September 3, 2013, Grads of Lesser-Ranked Law Schools Are Happy Campers, compared job satisfaction data among graduates of the variously ranked schools.  There, the author notes that “[g]raduates of elite schools are sometime a bit disdainful of the demands of the profession, while those with lesser pedigrees probably just appreciate the opportunity to work.”

Subscribers can follow the blog and receive updates of its “News Views and Alerts” via email, Facebook, and Twitter.  Blog posts from the home page are listed by date, the most recent first.  To access older posts, readers of the blog have to scroll to the bottom of the page and click on “More Posts.”  A reader can also find blog topics by clicking on “Topic Tags” under each blog post.  There is a dearth of reader comments to the posts on the blog, which seems unusual considering it gets a lot of traffic.  But, despite their disinterest in commenting, the blog’s readers are still exposed to a plethora of topical news and articles, as well as, an updated list of current top jobs.  Attention-grabbing post topics and headlines, coupled with a legal focus, make The Careerist an entertaining and informative blog.

~ Leanne Boyd, L’15 ~

Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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