Category Archives: electronic resources

CSL Library Academic Success Collection Guide

The CSL Library’s Academic Success Collection is located behind the circulation desk on the 5th floor.

This collection includes resources like hornbooks, practice exams, flashcards, audio CDs, and law school success books. Students may browse available titles by subject using the online library catalog, or they can discuss with an Academic Success Counselor which resources might be best suited to their purpose.

The Academic Success Collection contains high-use materials of interest to a large number of students, covering a wide variety of subjects, which is why the materials are on reserve and have limited loan periods. The Academic Success resources are available for a 3 day checkout. Some of the Academic Success resources listed below are also available as a reserve item. Reserve items are limited to a 3 hour checkout.

The following is a general description of the types of Academic Success resources available for each of the 1L classes and for many of the upper level courses:

  • Black Letter Outlines – These outlines summarize the basic black letter rules of each topic in a way that allows students to appreciate how different parts of their course material fit together.
  • Concise Hornbook Series – Discusses specific problems and illustrations, focusing on topics covered in a typical course on civil procedure, tied to no particular casebook.
  • Crunch Time Series – Crunch Times include a summary of about 100 pages, summarizing all the key concepts in easy-to-read outline form, Exam Tips, drawn from analysis of exactly what has been asked on hundreds of past essay and short-answer law exams, Flow Charts short-answer and multiple-choice questions , and complex issue-spotting essay questions. 
  • Emanuel Law Outlines – Emanuel Law Outlines support your class preparation, provide reference for your outline creation, and supply a comprehensive breakdown of topic matter for your entire study process. Also included are exam questions with model answers, an alpha-list of cases, and a cross reference table of cases for all of the leading casebooks.
  • Examples & Explanations – Examples and Explanations are written in clear text and contain many concrete examples as well as questions and answers with detailed explanations for help in reviewing concepts.  Certain legal concepts are explained with the aid of charts and graphics, and sample examination questions are provided with their model answers.
  • Hornbooks – Hornbooks cover a single legal subject and are written expressly for law students by law professors.  These condensed one-volume overviews are written in clear, accessible language.  They contain discussion of courts’ interpretation of the law, explanations of the application of the law today, and may contain hypothetical questions and model answers.  
  • Nutshells – Nutshells are small, paperback texts that present concise overviews of areas of law. Nutshells are considered the most basic secondary source on a legal topic.
  • Q&A Series – These LexisNexis study guide series feature hundreds of multiple-choice and short-answer questions arranged topically, plus an additional sets of questions comprising a final “practice exam.”  For each multiple-choice question, authors provide a detailed answer that indicates which of four options is the best answer and explains thoroughly why that option is better than the other three options. 
  • Siegel’s Series – The Siegel’s Series works through key topics in Q&A format, providing an additional source for self-quizzing. Titles in this exam-prep series contain essay questions with model answers, as well as multiple-choice questions and answers. 
  • Understanding Series – The Understanding the Law series of hornbooks covers the central concepts and issues students encounter in the basic 1L law course, as well as the leading cases.  Topics that typically cause the most confusion are covered in-depth.

Additional Material Types Available from the Library

  • Bar Prep Materials – In the final Stretch? Check out the Bar Prep Materials your library has to offer.
  • Audio CDs – Designed for Audio Learners, or students with long commutes, these convenient audio CD’s present legal topics in a clear, succinct, timesaving format.
  • Flash Cards – For reviewing legal topics point-by-point, Law in a Flash Card Sets contain hundreds of short questions and provide precise answers on the flip side.

~Aaron Greene~

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Free Online Resource for Immigration: Immigration Consequences of a Criminal Conviction in North Carolina

free

Charlotte Law Library is continuing a series of blogs on the free online resources available on the website of the North Carolina Court System Office of Indigent Defense Services (NCIDS).

This blog will focus on the Immigration Consequences of a Criminal Conviction in North Carolina available for free online as a pdf.

“Using a step-by-step approach to the immigration consequences of a criminal conviction, this essential guide explains the different types of immigration status and the various criminal convictions that trigger removal (deportation) in light of a person’s immigration status. Included is a detailed chart of immigration consequences of various North Carolina offenses as well as a removable, laminated checklist [print version] highlighting the key consequences.”

Here is the Table of Contents:

Immigration Consequences Manual

Title Page, Table of Contents, and Preface
Chapter 1: Overview
Chapter 2: Determining Your Client’s Citizenship and Immigration Status
Chapter 3: Criminal Grounds of Removal
Chapter 4: Conviction and Sentence for Immigration Purposes
Chapter 5: Determining Possible Immigration Consequences Based on Your Client’s Immigration Status
Chapter 6: Options for Minimizing Adverse Immigration Consequences
Chapter 7: Procedures Related to Removal
Chapter 8: State Post-Conviction Relief
Appendix A: Selected Immigration Consequences of North Carolina Offenses
Appendix B: Legal Resources for Indigent Defense Attorneys and Noncitizen Clients in North Carolina
(revised April 2008)
Summary Checklist

This manual is an invaluable resource for those who work in immigration law.  Just look at how this resource is packed with practical information!

Here is the Table of Contents of a typical chapter:

Chapter 6:

Options for Minimizing Adverse Immigration Consequences

6.1 General Rules 70

A. Offenses That Do Not Carry Adverse Immigration Consequences

B. Deferred Prosecution

C. Record of Conviction

D. Pleading Not Guilty

E. Post-Conviction Relief

6.2 Cases Involving Aggravated Felonies 72

A. Aggravated Felonies Triggered by a One Year Term of Imprisonment

B. Aggravated Felonies Triggered by More than a $10,000 Loss

C. Crime of Violence Aggravated Felony

6.3 Cases Involving Drugs 74

A. Possession of 30 Grams or Less of Marijuana

B. Simple Possession of a Controlled Substance

C. Accessory after the Fact

D. Non-Drug Charges

E. Admissions Involving Drugs

6.4 Cases Involving Crimes Involving Moral Turpitude 76

A. Offense That Is Not a Crime Involving Moral Turpitude

B. One Misdemeanor CMT

C. One Felony CMT for Noncitizen Admitted to the U.S. for More Than Five Years

6.5 Cases Involving Firearms 77

A. Weapons Offenses That Do Not Specifically Involve a Firearm

B. Non-Aggravated Felony

C. Accessory after the Fact

6.6 Cases Involving Domestic Violence 78

A. Offense That Is Not a Crime of Violence

B. Offense That Is Not Against a Person

Look for this symbol for future blogs on free online resources:

free

Come see us in the library for more resources in print and online.  And for immigration research, check out our Research Guide on Immigration Law.

~Mary Susan Lucas~

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Westlaw Webinars: Transition from Westlaw® Classic to WestlawNext®

Make the transition from Westlaw Classic to WestlawNext smoother in August with two upcoming webinars: “From Westlaw Classic to Next” webinars, Basic and Advanced.

Basic webinar:

  • Where to find your favorite aspects of Westlaw Classic on WestlawNext
  • Information on Finds and Searching
  • Boolean Searches
  • KeyCite®
  • Key Numbers

Advanced webinar:

  • Alerts on WestlawNext
  • Custom Pages (similar to tabs on Westlaw Classic)
  • Folders
  • Practical Law

Both webinars will review how to save the Research Trails you use the most on Westlaw Classic so you have them available for WestlawNext.

Upcoming Webinar Dates

  • Basic
    August 4th — 2pm Eastern, 1pm Central, Noon MT, 11am PT — Register Today

    Advanced
    August 7th — Noon Eastern, 11am CT, 10am MT, 9am PT — Register Today

    Basic
    August 13th — 1pm Eastern, Noon Central, 11am MT, 10am PT — Register Today

    Advanced
    August 15th — 1pm ET, Noon CT, 11am MT, 10am PT — Register Today

    Each of these classes will be held weekly through August; therefore, if the above times do not fit into your schedule, check the webinar page for more dates and times.

Online Trainings Available

Not able to attend? The topics covered in these webinars, as well as additional topics, are available through Westlaw in short, online trainings.

Visit the From Classic To WestlawNext training page for access and for more information.

Contact the reference desk if you have any questions or need any assistance!

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Self-Care as a Law Student: What do you do to take care of yourself?

As a law student, you are expected to attend classes, write scholarly papers, and perform at a superior level on assessments.  Additionally, you may be working while going to law school which involves meetings and time commitments.  You also may have a significant other, children, or family that requires time and support.  Lastly, you require the most basic needs of food, water, and shelter.  But your body and mind need more than the basic needs to function at a healthy level.

selfcare1

What is Self-Care?

So, you may ask what is self-care and how will it benefit me.  Well, self-care involves behaviors and attitudes that assist in preserving an individual’s well-being and personal health.   Self-care is also a significant feature in managing stress.

selfcare2

Importance of Self-Care

Self-care can benefit your physical and emotional health.  Physically, the relaxation that comes with doing self-care allows your body to trigger the relaxation response.  This relaxation response is vital to our health.  Without relaxation, our body would function in fight-or-flight mode where the body is constantly in a state of physiological arousal.  This relaxation response within our body allows our blood pressure, heart rate, and digestive functioning to return to its normal rate.

Emotionally, taking time to focus on your needs and wellbeing will make you feel great about your life and your body while expressing to others that you value yourself.  Additionally, as a caretaker, you may neglect your personal needs to take care of others, but this can lead to unhappiness, low self-esteem, and feelings of bitterness.  Engaging in self-care can transform you into a better caretaker for others.

selfcare3

Effective Self-Care Strategies:

  1. Eat healthy foods
  2. Get between 6-8 hours of sleep per night
  3. Engage in regular physical activity
  4. Maintain social support and catch up with a friend
  5. Find a new hobby
  6. Reframe life circumstances in more positive, yet realistic ways
  7. Learn to say no
  8. Meditate
  9. Go offline
  10. Take an afternoon nap
  11. Journal
  12. Do yoga
  13. Listen to music
  14. Take a walk outside
  15. Have a pampering massage

For more self-care strategies, click here!

Additionally, check out our Health & Wellness LibGuide which includes print and electronic resources for you!

~Brooke Rideout~

References

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Net Neutrality or a Two-Tiered Internet?

What is net neutrality and what are the issues?

Law professor Tim Wu coined the phrase “net neutrality” in a 2003 law review article.   While net neutrality has a number of complex implications, the main idea here is that the Internet is an impartial conduit for information and that all traffic on the Internet would be equal.  That concept seems pretty straightforward. However, net neutrality is a complex, important concept to understand.

netneutrality1

Tim Wu (Open Rights Group)

Since the world moved from dial-up to broadband, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has worked to keep the Internet open and neutral. However, on January 4th, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals struck down the FCC’s “Open Internet” rules in Verizon v. FCC. Basically, the court stated that the FCC does not have the authority to impose its net neutrality rules on Internet service providers (ISPs).

“Even though the Commission has general authority to regulate in this arena, it may not impose requirements that contravene express statutory mandates. Given that the Commission has chosen to classify broadband providers in a manner that exempts them from treatment as common carriers, the Communications Act expressly prohibits the Commission from nonetheless regulating them as such.”

As a result of this decision, there is a grey area that allows Comcast or Verizon to charge extra to have content from certain providers like Netflix streamed more quickly or give preference to their business partners.

Founding Principle. The Internet was founded on the principle of net neutrality. As Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who created the World Wide Web, has said, “Being able to connect freely and equally to the Internet is the fundamental social basis of the Internet, and, now the society is based on it” (Scola, 2014). We take for granted that we as a members of our society, we can access the information we want just like everyone else.

Consumerism. The Consumers Union has been vocal in the debate on net neutrality. They believe that the new FCC rules while prohibiting Internet service providers from blocking traffic, would allow ISPs to charge online providers like Amazon, Google, or Netflix a fee for preferred access to customers. Delara Derakhshani, Policy Counsel for Consumers Union, stated that this Internet fast lane “could create a tiered Internet where consumers either pay more for content and speed, or get left behind with fewer choices” (“Internet,” 2014). Conceivably, content providers could give preferential treatment to online sites that pay them the most.

Innovation. American Libraries Association (ALA) President Barbara Stripling argues that having to pay for faster, efficient access would dissuade entrepreneurs from experimenting. Websites of small businesses and nonprofits would be out of the mainstream and all those start-ups would never make it out of their garages. Stripling has stated, “Many of the innovative services we use today were create by entrepreneurs who had a fair chance to compete for web traffic. By enabling the Internet service providers to limit access, we are essentially saying that only the privileged can continue to innovate” (Miller, 2014). While limiting access would not be the end of the Internet, we could lose the creativity that has resulted in current advances.

Intellectual Freedom. The ALA’s policy statement on the issue of net neutrality is based on the value of intellectual freedom. Intellectual freedom is one of the ethical principles of the profession and is included in the Code of Ethics of the American Library Association. Intellectual freedom is the “right of all peoples to seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction.”  The Internet allows everyone to inform themselves and others. Without net neutrality, information could be more restricted.

Digital Divide. In April, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) held a hearing to focus on the role of libraries in providing Internet Services. The IMLS is charged with advising the president and Congress in such matters. The hearings highlighted the fact that the digital divide continues to grow in this country. A Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project report in 2013 states that while 70% of Americans have broadband access; 88% of households with incomes over $75,000 have broadband. Only 54% of households with an annual income of less than $30,000 have broadband. Furthermore, the Pew study found 63 million Americans do not have either a broadband connection or a smartphone.

Access.  Public libraries, not only worried about having to negotiate with ISPs over potentially high rates for patrons to have access to the library’s resources, are also concerned about the broader issue of protecting the equitable use of the Internet for the “common good.” 77 million people use the public library for Internet access each year (“ALA Responds,” 2014). According IMLS President Susan Hildreth, 60% of American libraries offer the only free computer Internet access in their communities and only 9% of those have high capacity connections (Herther, 2014). Furthermore, Internet service providers will not have any business incentive to run fiber optic cable to small towns; and without fiber optic cable, there is no broadband access. Without a policy of net neutrality, these numbers will only go down.

Some organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) have gone so far as to warn that ISPs could conceivably slow down the websites of political parties and other organizations with which the ISPs’ executives disagree.

A Solution. Kathleen Ann Ruane in a report for the Congressional Research Service suggests a solution for the FCC that would enable the Commission to continue its advocacy of net neutrality. According to the Verizon ruling, the FCC does have the authority to issue rules; however, because Internet service providers are classified as information services rather than telecommunication services, the net neutrality rules concerning anti-blocking and anti-discrimination were thrown out. A reclassification of broadband Internet service providers would seem to be a logical solution for the FCC and others advocating for net neutrality.

Net neutrality is complex and important issue.  After reading about the issues, there are still other underlying questions such as: how do you allocate scarce resources (bandwidth) in a free market economy? Traditionally that would be regulated by price. So then the question becomes who pays and how much? This blog only touches the surface.

Still confused?

John Oliver describes net neutrality as the most boring important issue. His humorous You Tube video (13:17) is worth watching. He gives a not-so-boring explanation.

What Can We Do?

Activists protest against proposed new net neutrality rules outside Federal Communications Commission in May. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Activists protest against proposed new net neutrality rules outside Federal Communications Commission in May. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Or we could….

Email comments to the FCC at openinternet@fcc.gov. The FCC has established a new inbox to accept comments through the summer. Chairman Wheeler plans to have new rules in place before the end of the year.

An Addendum

On Thursday, July 10, 2014, 11 higher education and library groups issued a set of 11 principles regarding net neutrality meant for the FCC to consider in its rule making. The principles can be found at http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EPO1305_1.pdf

Want to read more?

  • American Library Association. (2014, March/April). ALA responds to net neutrality decision. American Libraries Magazine, 45(3/4), 10.
  • Chant, I. (2014, February 15). Court strikes down net neutrality. Library Journal, 139(3), 12-14.
  • Delta, G.B. & Matsuura, J. H. (2014).  Regulation of Access, Interoperability, and Services.
  • In Law of the internet.  St. Paul, MN:  Thomson/West.
  • Heller, M. (2014, June 23). What should academic librarians know about net neutrality? [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://acrl.ala.org/techconnect/?p=4396
  • Herther, N. K. (2014, June).  FCC and IMLS update focus. Information Today, 31(5), 1-35.
  • Internet rules could put you in the slow lane. (2014, July). Consumer Reports, 79(7), 10.
  • Miller, R.T. (2014). A commons at risk. Library Journal, 139(3), 8.
  • Scola, N. (2014, June 12). Five myths about net neutrality. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/five-myths-about-net-neutrality/2014/06/12/ff58ad7c-ec06-11e3-93d2-edd4be1f5d9e_story.html

~Betty Thomas~

 

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Check Out Our New Federal Tax Research Guide

If you are new to the Charlotte School of Law community, you may be interested to know that CSL librarians develop and maintain a collection of electronic legal research guides.  These guides “contain a range of information tools that are designed to assist you with your research and study at Charlotte School of Law. They are a pathway to library resources most relevant to your area of study. LibGuides are created by CSL librarians and contain recommended library resources – books, databases, journals and websites, as well as helpful research tips.”

One of the most recent legal research guides added to the collection is a Federal Tax Research Guide.  This guide “covers both primary and secondary sources of tax law and was created to help facilitate the tax research process.”  It directs users to both print and electronic tax law resources, including the Internal Revenue Code, judicial sources, agency orders and opinions, memoranda and announcements, current awareness resources, the U.S. Master Tax Guide, the Internal Revenue Manual, and more.

To browse other legal research guides or to receive email alerts when guides of interest to you are published, click here.  And, as always, contact the reference desk if you have any questions or need any assistance!

~Shannon Reid~

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Westlaw Webinars: Transition from Westlaw® Classic to WestlawNext®

Make the transition from Westlaw Classic to WestlawNext smoother in June with two upcoming webinars: “From Westlaw Classic to Next” webinars, Basic and Advanced.

Basic webinar:

  • Where to find your favorite aspects of Westlaw Classic on WestlawNext
  • Information on Finds and Searching
  • Boolean Searches
  • KeyCite®
  • Key Numbers

Advanced webinar:

  • Alerts on WestlawNext
  • Custom Pages (similar to tabs on Westlaw Classic)
  • Folders
  • Practical Law

Both webinars will review how to save the Research Trails you use the most on Westlaw Classic so you have them available for WestlawNext.

Upcoming Webinar Dates

  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Basic – June 17 at 10 am CT – Register today.
  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Advanced – June 18 at 2 pm CT – Register today.
  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Basic – June 20 at 12 (Noon) pm CT – Register today.
  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Advanced – June 23 at at 3 pm CT – Register today.
  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Basic – June 26 at 12 (Noon) pm CT – Register today.
  • From Westlaw Classic to Next Advanced – June 27 at at 1 pm CT – Register today.

Visit the webinar page for more information about these and other upcoming webinars.

Online Trainings Available

Not able to attend? The topics covered in these webinars, as well as additional topics, are available through Westlaw in short, online trainings.

Visit the From Classic To WestlawNext training page for access and for more information.

Contact the reference desk if you have any questions or need any assistance!

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