Forsenic Science: Making the Important Connections


Yesterday, less than 30 miles from Charlotte, 41 year-old, Patrick Burris was shot and killed. Burris is the suspected Gaffney serial killer, and with his death authorities hope to put some fears to rest.  According to MSNBC, officers were responding to a burglary complaint on July 6th that ultimately ended in the shootout with Burris.   State Law Enforcement Division Chief Reggie Lloyd concluded that the “bullets in [Burris’s] gun matched those that killed residents in and around Gaffney over six days last week.”

Curious about the theories and methods that police officers and SBI agents use in criminal investigations?  Or, the forensic techniques used to make the connection between the bullets found in Gastonia, Burris and the Gaffney murders?

Then, check these out:

Forensic science resources

Crime and science; the new frontier in criminology / Thorwald, Jürgen.

Forensic science : an encyclopedia of history, methods, and techniques / William J. Tilstone, Kathleen A. Savage, and Leigh A. Clark.

Arrest, search, and investigation in North Carolina / Robert L. Farb.

-Liz McCurry-

2 Comments

Filed under collection, News

2 responses to “Forsenic Science: Making the Important Connections

  1. Charles Lifford

    I am surprised the National Acadamy of Sciences report “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward” was not listed. It is an excellent report, though critical of the current state of the profession. It can be read online at: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12589 It was cited in a recent Supreme Court opinion that allowed defendants to cross examine the forensic scientists who perform the tests.

  2. Charles Lifford

    I am surprised that the National Academy of Sciences report, “Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward” was not listed. Though critical of the profession, it is an excellent review of forensic techniques. It can be read online at: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12589 This report was cited in the June 25th 2009 Supreme Court decision that allowed defendants to cross examine their forensic analysts.

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