Need Plans Over the Holiday Weekend?

Don’t sweat it; the Charlotte Mecklenburg Parks and Recreation department has you covered. The Romare Bearden Park in uptown Charlotte will host the Bearden Birthday Bash over the Labor Day Weekend, Friday, August 29th – Sunday, August 31st, at the Park which is located at 300 S. Church Street.

The festival is in celebration of the park’s namesake, Romare Bearden’s birthday and to commemorate the park’s one year anniversary. There will be live bands Friday evening through Sunday afternoon and Saturday afternoon Radio Disney will be at the park to host children’s activities.

Make sure to bring your lawn chairs or blankets and feel free to bring food and drinks (no glass) for a fun family picnic.

For more questions or for a schedule of the weekend events check here.

If you are unable to attend the Bearden Birthday bash but would still like to check out this awesome park check out one of the events below.

Party in the Park Series: This is a series of weekly performances featuring fun and energetic bands each Wednesday from 5:30-9 pm with live music starting at 6 pm. Lawn chairs and picnics are welcome, food and beverage will be available for purchase. Please no glass containers.

Upcoming performances:

  • September 3 Too Much Sylvia
  • September 10 The Swingin’ Medallions
  • September 17 Gal Friday
  • September 24 The Dickens

Music Box Lunch Series: These are small informal musical presentations featuring local and regional talent performing, noon – 1:30 pm.

Upcoming performances:

  • August 29 Tim Gordon
  • September 2 Neal Davenport
  • September 5 5 on Sundays duo
  • September 9 Gabriel Bello
  • September 12 Shane Tracy
  • September 16 Roy Daye
  • September 23 Carrie Marshall

Bearden Music Series: Come out each month to enjoy your Saturday in the park with evenings of Cajun, Beach Music and more! Bring your lawn chair and picnic blankets to relax or dance the night away with some of the region’s most popular musicians. Outside food and pets are welcomed, please no alcohol or glass containers. Food and beverage will be available for purchase.

September 20 – Cajun

  • Mel Melton & The Wicked Mojos
  • Bayou Diesel
  • Jeffery Broussard & The Creole Cowboys

Fitness Program:

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The 2014 fitness program provides high quality, full-service fitness programming, scheduling and support at Romare Bearden Park on a weekly basis. Programs include Yoga, Zumba and Boot Camp sessions. View the schedule. Classes are FREE until further notice. To register, click here and create an account.

~Minerva Mims~

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Announcement: New CLE Event for NCCP Exam Preparation

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Title: North Carolina Certified Paralegal (NCCP) Exam Preparation Course
Date: Friday, September 5 – Saturday, September 6, 2014
Location: Charlotte School of Law – Charlotte Plaza Building

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WestlawNext System Announcement

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Westlaw Next Alert

WestlawNext downtime for system maintenance this weekend – please plan accordingly, and feel free to contact the library with any questions or concerns.

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Sunday Student Access to the Charlotte Law Library

The Charlotte Law Library is open on Sundays from 8 am – 11pm, and during midterms and final exams 8 am – midnight.

  • The circulation desk is open noon – 9 pm.
  • The reference desk is open noon – 6 pm.

On Sundays, all the entrances to the building are locked. To get in, there is a reader on the wall outside the College Street entrance near the revolving doors. Swipe your card to get into the building.

To leave the building, there is a red button to push on the wall between the two doors on the College Street entrance/exit.

If someone has a problem getting into the building, there is a button to connect to security. These measures are for your safety.

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~Betty Thomas~

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ALR Student’s Corner: North Carolina Law of Damages

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What is North Carolina Law of Damages?

North Carolina Law of Damages (5th edition) is a two-volume, annotated practice guide for attorneys practicing in North Carolina. It provides a wide-range of information on damages as they pertain to such legal topics as criminal proceedings, hospital liens, personal injury, fraud and deceit, wrongful death, family torts, estates, and statutory penalties. These diverse topics represent a mere fraction of the information available in North Carolina Law of Damages, making it an enormously valuable resource for attorneys researching the law of damages in North Carolina as it applies to a multitude of civil law issues.

This practice guide is exceptionally well organized; topics are broken down further into concise sub-topics, 269 in total. Part I (Damages, Generally) contains 12 chapters and 88 subtopics, while Part II (Damages Relating to Particular Subject Areas) contains 26 chapters and 181 subtopics. This organization provides an extremely user-friendly way of searching for almost any information about damages in North Carolina.

How to Locate North Carolina Law of Damages

To locate the electronic version of the practice guide on WestlawNext, type the title in the universal search box and, once “North Carolina Law of Damages” populates in the suggestion box below, select the practice guide (note: make certain to check the “Show Suggestions” box beforehand). From there, you can choose Part I for general information on damages or Part II for more specific information on damages relating to a particular subject.  The electronic version of the practice guide might also be accessed on WestlawNext by drilling down in accordance with the following navigational path: “Browse: All Content” > “Secondary Sources” > “North Carolina” > “Texts & Treatises” > “North Carolina Law of Damages.”

The print version of the practice guide is available at the Charlotte School of Law library; the call number (KFN7595 .W66 2004 v.1) can be accessed via the library catalog with the following search string: “north carolina damages.”  The practice guide can also be purchased for $312.00 with monthly updates costing $27.00.

How to Search North Carolina Law of Damages

To demonstrate how easy and helpful this practice guide is, let’s conduct a hypothetical search.  Let’s say that a client has come to you after a trial judge set aside a jury verdict awarding him $10,000 in compensatory damages and $50,000 in punitive damages. To advise your client, you decide to determine whether the damages are considered excessive under North Carolina law. This is a more general topic, so you consult Part I of North Carolina Law of Damages. From the table of contents, you decide “Chapter 7: Amount of Damages” seems relevant to your client’s issue, and even more so, the subtopic below, “§ 7:4 – Excessive or inadequate damages.” Turning to that section in the volume, you learn the trial judge has discretionary power to set aside an award of damages if she believes that the damages are excessive or inadequate and given under the influence of passion or prejudice, or if the evidence is insufficient to justify the verdict. This does not provide much guidance as to whether your client’s award of damages might be considered excessive. However, § 7:4 goes on to state that a ruling by the trial judge on the issue of damages is within her discretion and will not be set aside except upon a showing of abuse of discretion. You can now advise your client appropriately, and you have North Carolina Law of Damages to thank for it.

~ Michelle Abbott, L’15 ~

 Class Advisor – Cory M. Lenz, Esq.

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CSL Library Academic Success Collection Guide

The CSL Library’s Academic Success Collection is located behind the circulation desk on the 5th floor.

This collection includes resources like hornbooks, practice exams, flashcards, audio CDs, and law school success books. Students may browse available titles by subject using the online library catalog, or they can discuss with an Academic Success Counselor which resources might be best suited to their purpose.

The Academic Success Collection contains high-use materials of interest to a large number of students, covering a wide variety of subjects, which is why the materials are on reserve and have limited loan periods. The Academic Success resources are available for a 3 day checkout. Some of the Academic Success resources listed below are also available as a reserve item. Reserve items are limited to a 3 hour checkout.

The following is a general description of the types of Academic Success resources available for each of the 1L classes and for many of the upper level courses:

  • Black Letter Outlines – These outlines summarize the basic black letter rules of each topic in a way that allows students to appreciate how different parts of their course material fit together.
  • Concise Hornbook Series – Discusses specific problems and illustrations, focusing on topics covered in a typical course on civil procedure, tied to no particular casebook.
  • Crunch Time Series – Crunch Times include a summary of about 100 pages, summarizing all the key concepts in easy-to-read outline form, Exam Tips, drawn from analysis of exactly what has been asked on hundreds of past essay and short-answer law exams, Flow Charts short-answer and multiple-choice questions , and complex issue-spotting essay questions. 
  • Emanuel Law Outlines – Emanuel Law Outlines support your class preparation, provide reference for your outline creation, and supply a comprehensive breakdown of topic matter for your entire study process. Also included are exam questions with model answers, an alpha-list of cases, and a cross reference table of cases for all of the leading casebooks.
  • Examples & Explanations – Examples and Explanations are written in clear text and contain many concrete examples as well as questions and answers with detailed explanations for help in reviewing concepts.  Certain legal concepts are explained with the aid of charts and graphics, and sample examination questions are provided with their model answers.
  • Hornbooks – Hornbooks cover a single legal subject and are written expressly for law students by law professors.  These condensed one-volume overviews are written in clear, accessible language.  They contain discussion of courts’ interpretation of the law, explanations of the application of the law today, and may contain hypothetical questions and model answers.  
  • Nutshells – Nutshells are small, paperback texts that present concise overviews of areas of law. Nutshells are considered the most basic secondary source on a legal topic.
  • Q&A Series – These LexisNexis study guide series feature hundreds of multiple-choice and short-answer questions arranged topically, plus an additional sets of questions comprising a final “practice exam.”  For each multiple-choice question, authors provide a detailed answer that indicates which of four options is the best answer and explains thoroughly why that option is better than the other three options. 
  • Siegel’s Series – The Siegel’s Series works through key topics in Q&A format, providing an additional source for self-quizzing. Titles in this exam-prep series contain essay questions with model answers, as well as multiple-choice questions and answers. 
  • Understanding Series – The Understanding the Law series of hornbooks covers the central concepts and issues students encounter in the basic 1L law course, as well as the leading cases.  Topics that typically cause the most confusion are covered in-depth.

Additional Material Types Available from the Library

  • Bar Prep Materials – In the final Stretch? Check out the Bar Prep Materials your library has to offer.
  • Audio CDs – Designed for Audio Learners, or students with long commutes, these convenient audio CD’s present legal topics in a clear, succinct, timesaving format.
  • Flash Cards – For reviewing legal topics point-by-point, Law in a Flash Card Sets contain hundreds of short questions and provide precise answers on the flip side.

~Aaron Greene~

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Links We Love Weekly Round-Up — August 25, 2014

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 Why the Public Library Beats Amazon — for Now

A growing stack of companies would like you to pay a monthly fee to read e-books, just like you subscribe to NetflixNFLX +0.77% to binge on movies and TV shows.  Don’t bother. Go sign up for a public library card instead.  Really, the public library? Amazon.comAMZN +0.23% recently launched Kindle Unlimited, a $10-per-month service offering loans of 600,000 e-books. Startups called Oyster and Scribd offer something similar. It isn’t very often that a musty old institution can hold its own against tech disrupters.  But it turns out librarians haven’t just been sitting around shushing people while the Internet drove them into irrelevance. More than 90% of American public libraries have amassed e-book collections you can read on your iPad, and often even on a Kindle. You don’t have to walk into a branch or risk an overdue fine. And they’re totally free.

Web Addiction

We can get addicted to many things. We all know about alcohol, drug and tobacco addiction, which is chemically based, but people get seriously addicted to gambling, overeating, exercise – and sex. Perhaps the most interesting of the non-chemical, electronic addictions are computer-game, amusement-arcade machine and one-arm-bandit addiction. But we have recently discovered another addiction – Internet addiction. For some people the net is the Prozac, for others the Viagra, of communication.

How We Think: John Dewey on the Art of Reflection and Fruitful Curiosity in an Age of Instant Opinions and Information Overload

Decades before Carl Sagan published his now-legendary Baloney Detection Kit for critical thinking, the great philosopher, psychologist, and education reformer John Dewey penned the definitive treatise on the subject — a subject all the more urgently relevant today, in our age of snap judgments and instant opinions. In his 1910 masterwork How We Think (free download; public library), Dewey examines what separates thinking, a basic human faculty we take for granted, from thinking well, what it takes to train ourselves into mastering the art of thinking, and how we can channel our natural curiosity in a productive way when confronted with an overflow of information.

The Future of Solo and Small-Firm Practice

Last week, at Minnesota’s Strategic Solutions for Solo and Small Firms Conference, I shared a panel with Lawyerist’s Sam Glover and an innovational speaker, Matt Homann. The panel focused on the future of solo and small-firm practice over the next ten years. Although we all agreed that the solos and smalls — and, indeed, lawyers in general — will face challenges over the next decade, I still believe that opportunities remain for solos who understand these challenges and figure out ways to overcome them.

Every Law Student is on Law Review

Law students writing on blogs and other social media are contributing valuable legal writing.  “Turn on your computer, write a blog post – and you’re an author,” says Andrea Lunsford, Stanford University’s Louise Hewlett Nixon Professor, Emerita.  The co-author of the digital-age writing guide Everyone’s an Author, told Angela Beccerra Viderergar (@abecegar) of the Stanford News that students are “writing more today than they ever have in the history of the world, and it’s because of social media.” Students themselves “may think it’s not writing, but it is writing, and it’s important writing.”

Bloggers Defeat Brett Kimberlin’s Vexatious Defamation Case in Maryland

Last year I talked about how the notorious and thoroughly evil Brett Kimberlin had sued several bloggers in Maryland state court for being mean to him. This is not to be confused with the ludicrous racketeering case that Kimberlin filed in Maryland federal court against a laundry list of detractors.  Today Kimberlin lost his state case at trial. He didn’t just lose — he lost conclusively. After the close of Kimberlin’s day of “evidence,” the judge granted a motion for a directed verdict against him.

Our “Must-Cite” Bankruptcy Cases

We at the Weil Bankruptcy Blog have compiled our favorite “must-cite” cases—the sort of cases that no brief or motion on a particular issue should go without citing.  The criteria were simple: If your emergency memo fails to cite to one particular case, will it come back with a note saying, “You missed something.  TRY AGAIN!”?  If so, then you’ve got a “must-cite” case.  (By the way, it also sounds like you’ve got a jerk for a boss, with all this last-minute memo writing and mean post-it notes.)

AI, Robotics and the Future of Jobs

The vast majority of respondents to the 2014 Future of the Internet canvassing anticipate that robotics and artificial intelligence will permeate wide segments of daily life by 2025, with huge implications for a range of industries such as health care, transport and logistics, customer service, and home maintenance. But even as they are largely consistent in their predictions for the evolution of technology itself, they are deeply divided on how advances in AI and robotics will impact the economic and employment picture over the next decade.

Charlotte Uptown Boosters Announce In-Depth Study to Revitalize North Tryon

An effort to revitalize North Tryon Street, backed by some of the city’s most powerful institutions, moved forward Monday with the hiring of a California-based urban planning firm to lead a $415,000 study of the corridor.  Charlotte Center City Partners and the Foundation for the Carolinas said MIG Inc., a Berkeley, Calif.-based firm with an office in Raleigh, will craft what the organizations are calling a “vision plan” for North Tryon.

Ideas for Charities That Missed Out on the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge’

The bizarreness of the ‘ice bucket challenge’ is well-summarized by the skeptical child in this photoshop asking why people are wasting clean water to avoid giving money to charity, and also by Arielle Pardes at Vice. “It’s like a game of Would-You-Rather involving the entire internet where, appallingly, most Americans would rather dump ice water on their head than donate to charity,” writes Pardes. “There are a lot of things wrong with the Ice Bucket Challenge, but the most annoying is that it’s basically narcissism masked as altruism.”  All true, but the thing is that it worked.

Start a NonProfit Law Firm

A few months back at my beat at Above the Law, I posed this question: Why Do Low Bono Work When You Can Start Your Own Non-Profit?.  After all, if new lawyers are going to be offering discount rates, they might as well run the show and gain the advantage of being the boss, plus the opportunity to take advantage of  loan forgiveness programs available to lawyers who work for non-profits.  Curious about how this business model might work in practice? Look no further than Open Legal Services (OLS), an innovative Utah-based non-profit law firm started by relatively new lawyers and recently profiled in The Atlantic.

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